Fj44 business jet engines

The Williams FJ44 is a family of small, two-spool, turbofan engines produced by Williams International/Rolls-Royce for the light business jet market.

The Williams FJ44 is a family of small, two-spool, turbofan engines produced by Williams International/Rolls-Royce for the light business jet market.

A business jet , private jet , or bizjet, or simply B.J., is a jet aircraft designed for transporting small groups of people. Business jets may be adapted for other ...

The Williams FJ44 is a family of small, two-spool, turbofan engines produced by Williams International / Rolls-Royce for the light business jet market. Until the recent boom in the very light jet market, the FJ44 was one of the smallest turbofans available for civilian applications. Although basically a Williams design, Rolls-Royce was brought into the project, at an early stage, to design, develop and manufacture an air-cooled high-pressure (HP) turbine for the engine. The FJ44 first flew on July 12, 1988 on the Scaled Composites/Beechcraft Triumph aircraft.

An uprated version, the 2300 lbf (10.23 kN) thrust FJ44-2A , was introduced in 1997. It has a larger 21.7 in (551 mm) diameter fan, with two additional booster stages to increase core flow. Owing to stressing considerations, the centrifugal compressor is throttled-back aerodynamically to a lower HPC pressure ratio than the -1. Other features include an exhaust mixer and an electronic fuel control unit. [4] The 2400 lbf (10.68 kN) thrust FJ44-2C is similar to the -2A, but incorporates an integrated hydromechanical fuel control unit.

Further updates include the 2004 introduction of the 2820 lbf (12.54 kN) thrust FJ44-3A , which is similar to the -2A, but features an increased diameter fan and dual channel FADEC (Full Authority Digital Engine Control) unit. [5] The 2490 lbf (11.08 kN) thrust FJ44-3A-24 is a derated version of the -3A.

When Cessna redesigned their popular CJ1 private jet, known for its low operating costs and high performance, the result was the CJ2: bigger, faster, and better. The cabin stretched an additional thirty-three inches, the wingspan stretched an additional thirty-five. Its cruise speed outdoes the CJ by thirty knots with a significantly reduced fuel burn.

The design goals of the Citation Jet series can be summed up in three words: simplicity, economy, and performance.  This proved to be a challenge, especially in creating an aerodynamic structure that is inexpensive to produce and handles well.  Previous Citations had used a straight wing, which slows the aircraft considerably but dramatically reduces production and design costs.  The Citation Jet upgraded to a natural laminar flow wing, which took four years to design in a joint venture between Cessna and NASA.  This wing delays the onset of airflow separation longer, which improves the lift-to-drag characteristics ten to fifteen percent when compared to earlier straight-wing designs.

The CJ2 is quite fuel-efficient, with an average fuel burn of 140 gallons per hour.  The economy of its fuel burn can be largely attributed to Cessna’s choice of engines.  It uses two Williams/Rolls-Royce FJ44-2C turbofan engines, each of which delivers 2,400 lbs. of thrust on takeoff (400 lbs. more than the CJ1 and CJ1+).

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